Tag Archives: emotions

Mindfulness in Schools – Programmes show promise

Figure 6: Bubble plot of the 19 controlled effects sizes against Intensity of mindfulness training and regression line. R2 (adjusted) = 0.52. [Zenner et al 2014] Studies show promise for improving cognitive performance, stress, coping, and resilience. With the ever-increasing interest in mindfulness-based programmes and the growing recognition that a more mindful approach to life may yield benefits in many life domains – if not in all of them – it… Read More »

The Liverpool Mindfulness Model

In my recent review paper on attentional control mechanisms in mindfulness meditation I also presented our Liverpool Mindfulness Model. The main purpose of this model is to serve as a structuring aid for our own meditation research.  It is thus more of an outline of the different aspects that should be considered when studying mindfulness practice – or, if you want, even a wish list of all the things we… Read More »

Cognition and Emotion in Meditation – Part 2

In the previous post I discussed evidence for the involvement of emotional processes even when performing a purely cognitive task. A further study investigated which brain areas are involved when a task similar to the Stroop task that was a focus in a previous post, is carried out, while the emotional state of the participant is challenged at the same time. As before, central to the task was the ability… Read More »

Cognition and Emotion in Meditation

Research has convincingly shown the positive effects of mindfulness meditation practice on attentional mechanisms. I discussed some of these findings in previous blogs, for instance the evidence that mindfulness practice is linked to improved attentional control, which is also evidenced by neural markers that show improved selective attention as well as improved conflict resolution mechanisms. While the refinement of attention skills certainly is a central aspect of many forms of… Read More »

The power of the mind: A wandering mind is an unhappy mind

This study is not quite new anymore (well, from 2010), but it is so instructive that when looking at it again today I thought it would be good to share this. Apologies if you know this one inside out already. One of the strengths of our mind is that we are able to plan and to predict what is going to happen in the future. Based on our prior experience… Read More »

Sustaining Happiness: The Science of Buddhist Meditation

Does meditation make you happy? A few years back I organised a symposium at the 2008 BA Festival of Science in Liverpool (now British Science Festival) to discuss the link between meditation practice, happiness and well-being.  At that time I was interviewed by Wholescience.net  – and below you can still listen to what I had to say. Since then, research moved on and there is meanwhile some good evidence that meditation… Read More »

Buddhists make rational economic decisions

A recent study into human decision-making revealed that experienced Buddhist meditators act more rationally in social situations that are commonly experienced as unfair. The study, carried out by researchers in the US and Canada, compared the decisions of experienced Buddhist meditators with that of control participants during the so-called Ultimatum Game. In a (simulated) two-person exchange the participants were offered a split of a certain amount of money ($20). If… Read More »